Cert IV OHS – Implementing Strategies to Control OHS Risk

In the Certificate IV in OHS, you’ll learn how to implement strategies for controlling OHS risk in the workplace.

SEEK INPUT FROM STAKEHOLDERS AND KEY PERSONNEL

In this section, you will identify the people who should be involved in developing risk controls.

Who should be involved?

In section 4.4 of the learning guide for BSBOHS403 Identify hazards and assess risks, it was identified that those involved in the risk assessment process should include:

  • stakeholders (those people or organisations who may be affected by, or perceive themselves to be affected by an activity or decision); and
  • key personnel (managers from related areas, people involved in decision-making or who are affected by the decision).

These people should also be involved in the development of risk controls.

Why should they be involved?

Those who do the work, those who have technical knowledge about the work and anybody who may have a stake in the work or safety outcomes, all have something to contribute and the right to be involved.

This is not only a practical requirement to ensure that the broadest range of options is considered and that the eventual outcome will actually work, but there is a legal obligation to involve those who may be affected by the risk control decisions, so that they have an opportunity to have input to decisions about risk management.

If you consider that you require a refresher on the legal rights and responsibilities related to consultation, then go to the unit of competency BSBOHS408 Assist with compliance with OHS and other relevant laws.

The checklist on the following page (introduced in the learning guide for BSBOHS403 Identify and Assess OHS risks) is a useful tool for identifying the stakeholders, key personnel and other OHS specialists who should be involved in developing controls.

Some people will have information that is more relevant to certain hazards. Remember, there may be a number of ways that you can obtain the information. It may be informal discussion or more formal processes such as meetings, focus groups or interviews.

‘People’ who may be involved in the development of risk controls

Stakeholders − those people or organisations who may be affected by, or perceive themselves to be affected by an activity or decision. Stakeholders in workplace OHS include:

  • managers
  • supervisors
  • health and safety and other employee representatives
  • OHS committees
  • employees and contractors
  • the community.

Key personnel are:

  • people who are involved in OHS decision-making or who are affected by decisions.

OHS technical advisors are persons providing specific technical knowledge or expertise in areas related to OHS and may include:

  • risk managers
  • health professionals
  • injury management advisors
  • legal practitioners with experience in OHS
  • engineers (such as design, acoustic, mechanical, civil)
  • security and emergency response personnel
  • workplace trainers and assessors
  • maintenance and trade persons.

OHS specialists − persons who specialise in one of the many disciplines that make up OHS including:

  • safety professionals
  • ergonomists
  • occupational hygienists
  • audiologists
  • safety engineers
  • toxicologists

LMIT delivers the Certificate IV in OHS and the Diploma in Occupational Health & Safety Completely Online in Sydney, Melbourne, Brisbane, Perth, Adelaide and Canberra.  The Advanced Diploma in OHS is also available via RPL only.

Published by: LMIT

Leave a Reply